Battle of North Point

(Please add http://marylandsociety.thewarof1812.info to exception site list)

-Enable pop-ups and java-

 

 

 


Baltimore City
Fort McHenry
British Bombardment Fleet
British Landing
Major General Samuel Smith
Battle of North Point
Brigadier General John Stricker
United States Riflemen
Maryland Fifth Regiment
Detachment Engages





 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




BALTIMORE CITY

 

 

 

 

 


Baltimore City - In the early Nineteen century Baltimore City was a thriving commercial port. The city was one of the most populous and wealth in America. The British called Baltimore a "den of Pirates", and promised to burn it to the ground. The week before the Battle of Baltimore, the British did burn Washington DC.

 



go to reference
go to viewer

 

 


 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

Fort McHenry

 

 




Fort McHenry - The star shaped fort was built in a Napoleonic fashion. The masonry walls were built between 1798 and 1803. The fort was named for James McHenry, our second Secretary of War. On September 13 and 14, the British attacked Fort McHenry after the land attack stalled. The failure of the bombardment and sight of the American flag inspired Francis Scott Key to compose "The Star-Spangled Banner."


 



go to reference
go to viewer

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

British Bombardment Fleet

 

 




British Bombardment Fleet - The British plan of attached was a combined land and sea operation. While the land operation occurred east of Baltimore, the fleet sailed towards the harbor to attack the fort.


 



go to reference
go to viewer

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

British Landing

 

 




British Landing - The British land at night a force of 5,000 men. This force included Royal Maries, soldiers, sailors and cannons. The British plan to march to Baltimore and burn the city.


 



go to reference
go to viewer

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

Major General Samuel Smith

 

 




The American commander of the defense of Baltimore. Smith fortified the eastern approach to Baltimore. Earthworks stretched from Belair road to Harris creek. The strong point with cannons in the defense was Hampstead hill which is currently in Patterson Park.


 



go to reference
go to viewer

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

Battle of North Point

 

 




The British attack the Americans on the peninsula known as North Point on September 12, 1814. The 3,000 American militia engage the 4,500 British regulars. The British succeed in taking the field by the end of the day. The battle to delay the British saves Baltimore from destruction.


 



go to reference
go to viewer

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

Brigadier General John Stricker

 

 




General Stricker commanded the 3rd Brigade at the Battle of North Point. The brigade consisted of five Maryland regiments. He chose the narrow spot in the peninsula at the Friends Meeting House for the battle. He established his command near Cook´┐┐s tavern.


 



go to reference
go to viewer

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

United States Riflemen

 

 




These infantry were accurate shots. They were used to harass the enemy and kill enemy leaders.


 



go to reference
go to viewer

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

Maryland Fifth Regiment

 

 




This Baltimore regiment fought bravely at the Bladensburg to defend Washington. It was the most reliable of the militia regiments, and most therefore placed on the road to block the British path. The regiment was headquartered at the Fifth regiment armory in Baltimore for most of the twentieth century. A museum is maintained today in this building with artifacts from the War of 1812.


 



go to reference
go to viewer

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

Detachment Engages

 

 




General Stricker sends a detachment of men forward to engage the British advanced troops. This group of volunteers was commanded by Major Heath. It included 150 infantry from the Maryland Fifth regiment and 70 riflemen. They met the British shortly after noon.

The detachment fought from behind trees and slowed the British advance. A shot from the riflemen killed the General Ross. The detachment then returned to their units.

The shot that killed General Ross is believed to be shot by one of two Baltimore riflemen. The riflemen were privates Henry G. McComas, age 18 and Daniel Wells, age 19. The British immediately returned fire killing both boys.




 


go to reference
go to viewer